The Number One Way Companies Hire

Imagine for a moment that you are in charge of planning your Mom’s 65th birthday celebration.  She has given you clear instructions that she does not want to put anyone “out” by hosting it at their house.

She wants to “go out” for her special day.

What steps would you take to start planning her party?

My guess is that you would think of places that she has been to and enjoyed. Maybe you would ask the people closest to her for their advice.

It’s all about making sure the venue is a perfect “fit” for her special day.

Successful Companies Do the Same Thing

During the KEEP video series, I had the chance to ask the question “what is the most successful way to find new employees?”

The overwhelming answer was: “ask current employees for referrals.”

Current employees know the culture of the company, might know people that would be a perfect fit for company, and it’s a simple introduction.

Now on the other hand, the employee is not going to refer that crazy brother-in-law that is always late for everything, as it would be a reflection on him (and likely doesn’t want to see him at work everyday as well).

Asking your employees for referral is by far the number one, and most successful way good companies recruit.

It’s also the quickest and least expensive method.

If you are looking for a job here are a few simple strategies to be on the top of mind for your contacts:

1) Make a list of 10 friends, family members to contact.

2) Contact them and let them know the specific opportunities you are looking for. The more personal the method the better (coffee meetings, a quick phone call) work well.  At the very least send them a personalized email.

3) Ask for their advice.

4) Be quiet and listen.

5) Follow up with them and the information they give you.

Shawn Shepheard is a business coach and internationally known inspirational speaker and author.  He was worked with Fortune 500 companies in both Canada and the United States and was the Director of the Keep Video Series.

For more lessons learned from the KEEP project please visit https://vimeo.com/keep